December Portrait - The Fleeting Moment

December 10, 2012  •  1 Comment

Sarah_Fogleman_SidesA For this post, I borrowed "The Fleeting Moment" from a photography blog I follow - A Lesser Photographer. The blog encourages a focus on creatvity and to quit obsessing about equipment. A recent quote from this blog fit into some of my thinking -“Longevity in photos has become inversely proportional to the lack of longevity in the subject.” Today's availability and capability of image capturing technology is remarkable. Through email, texts, and social networks these images are shared with immediacy. But I have come to think of these images as the photographic equivalent of consuming McDonald's french fries, which I kinda like. However, we consume McDonald's fries quickly and they do relatively little to satisfy us very long, much less make a lasting impression on us. We are consuming images in the same way. They are on our screen for a few seconds and then replaced by the next image. But the analogy breaks down when considering the quality of the images. McDonald's french fries are always the same. But many of the images we see, regardless of the technical quality, are worth preserving. And pictures of people important to us have a special value. I want to encourage all of us to think more about and curate some of the images we are generating. Some images demand longevity. My postings on this blog have slowed down because of my other passion - family history. I am finishing a book on my mother's ancestors and this fall luckily made contact with distant cousins, one of whom sent me this portrait of my 4th great grandmother, Sarah Fogleman Sides. Besides having a picture of an ancestor born in the 18th century, I love the look on her face. Most early portraits depict individuals with stern faces, partly because long exposure times were required. However, Sarah to me seems to be stifling a laugh and saying 'would you hurry up'. This holiday season make a gift to your self and posterity by printing a few pictures important to you.


Comments

Edie Littlefield Sundby(non-registered)
Dave your analogy about McDonald's french fries and today's photographic images is so true and unfortunately applies to more than just photography. it used to be people felt as the Native Americans that in order to understand and connect with a person one needed to "walk a moon in their moccasins." That phrase became "walk a mile in my shoes" which is a lot less time than a moon. And it's getting shorter. In fact so short that there is no meaningful connection whatsoever. Photographs, like books and ideas, can transform our consciousness. But they have to settle there first and can't be just a fleeting passive thought or occurrence. Alas, maybe things will slow down again as all of our techno brains get fried and incapable of holding so much meaninglessness.
No comments posted.
Loading...

Archive
January February March April May June July August (1) September (2) October November December
January February March April May June (2) July August September October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December
January February March April May June July (2) August (1) September (1) October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December